Section 54F of the Income Tax Act: A Guide to Exemptions on Capital Gains

Taxation forms a significant part of any country’s financial framework, playing a pivotal role in the development and growth of the nation. Among the various forms of taxes, Income Tax holds considerable importance.

Capital gain is a type of income that arises when a capital asset is sold. It is the difference between the purchase price (known as the cost of acquisition) and the sale price of an asset. When such gains are significant, they can lead to substantial tax liability. Fortunately, the Income Tax Act provides provisions for claiming exemptions on such gains, one of them being Section 54F.

Section 54F is an essential provision of the Income Tax Act that allows taxpayers to claim exemption on long-term capital gains arising from the sale of any long-term capital asset, provided they invest in a residential house. This section serves a dual purpose – it promotes real estate investment and provides relief to taxpayers from hefty capital gain tax charges.

Deep Dive into Section 54F

Understanding the nuances of Section 54F requires getting familiar with some key terms:

  1. Long-term capital asset: As per the Income Tax Act, a long-term capital asset is an asset that is held by an individual for more than three years. However, certain assets like equity shares, preference shares, debentures, etc., held for more than 12 months, are also considered long-term capital assets.
  2. Net consideration: The ‘net consideration’ refers to the sale price of the asset being sold, reduced by any expenditure incurred exclusively in connection with the transfer. In simpler terms, it’s the amount you receive after selling your asset, after accounting for any associated costs.

The crux of Section 54F revolves around the concept of reinvesting the net consideration from the sale of an original asset into a new residential house. The ‘original asset’ here refers to any long-term capital asset that is not a residential house, while the ‘new asset’ implies the residential house that the assessee purchases or constructs using the sale proceeds.

Eligibility for Exemption Under Section 54F

To avail the exemption under Section 54F, an individual must satisfy the following conditions:

  1. The assessee: The individual claiming exemption should be an individual assessee, i.e., a person or a Hindu Undivided Family (HUF).
  2. Long-term capital asset: The asset transferred should be a long-term capital asset. Remember, the duration for long-term varies between types of assets.
  3. Investment in residential house: The assessee should invest the net consideration in purchasing or constructing a residential house. The purchase should be made either one year before or two years after the date of transfer of the original asset. In the case of construction, it should be within three years after the date of transfer of the original asset.

Restrictions and Limitations

Despite its many advantages, Section 54F imposes certain limitations:

  1. The benefit of Section 54F is not available if the assessee, on the date of transfer of the original asset, owns more than one residential house apart from the new asset.
  2. The exemption becomes void if the assessee purchases any residential house other than the new asset within a period of one year after the date of transfer of the original asset or constructs any residential house other than the new asset within a period of three years after the date of transfer of the original asset.

Amendment to Section 54F in Finance Act, 2023

The Finance Act, 2023 has introduced a new amendment to Section 54F of the Income Tax Act. As per this amendment:

“Provided further that where the cost of new asset exceeds ten crore rupees, the amount exceeding ten crore rupees shall not be taken into account for the purposes of this sub-section.”

This essentially implies that if the cost of the new residential property purchased or constructed exceeds INR 10 crores, the amount exceeding INR 10 crores will not be considered for exemption under Section 54F.

Let’s understand this with an example:

Example: Assume you sold a non-residential property (the original asset) for INR 15 crores, resulting in a long-term capital gain. Now, if you invest all of the proceeds (INR 15 crores) in a new residential house (the new asset), the cost of the new asset for the purposes of calculating exemption under Section 54F would be limited to INR 10 crores only. This means that the capital gains corresponding to the INR 5 crores (amount exceeding INR 10 crores) would be subject to tax.

This amendment is designed to prevent potential misuse of Section 54F by ultra-high net-worth individuals for tax evasion purposes. It promotes fair tax practices and broadens the tax base by limiting the maximum exemption available under this section to the cost of a new residential house up to INR 10 crores.

This amendment has come into effect from the financial year 2023-24 onwards, and you must consider it while planning your taxes and investments.

Capital Gains Account Scheme (CGAS)

Now that we’ve taken a closer look at the concept of long-term capital assets and net consideration, it’s time to understand the Capital Gains Account Scheme (CGAS).

The Income Tax Act provides for certain exemptions if the capital gains from the transfer of a long-term capital asset are reinvested in specific modes within a stipulated period. However, sometimes it might not be possible to invest the capital gains to claim exemptions within the due date for filing of income tax return for the relevant year. In such cases, the unutilized amount of capital gains can be deposited in the Capital Gains Account Scheme (CGAS) until the due dates for the investment.

The CGAS is a scheme introduced by the Central Government in 1988. You can open a CGAS account in any public sector bank or other banks as specified by the RBI. The amount deposited in this account can be used for the specified reinvestment options only.

I’m glad you’re finding the information helpful. Let’s proceed with the next part of the article.

Calculating the Exemption Under Section 54F

Section 54F provides for two scenarios while calculating the exemption:

  1. Full exemption: If the cost of the new asset (the residential house) is not less than the net consideration of the original asset, the entire capital gain is exempted. In simpler terms, if all the sales proceeds are invested in the new house, the whole capital gain will be exempted from taxation.
  2. Partial exemption: If the cost of the new asset is less than the net consideration of the original asset, the exemption is allowed proportionately. The formula for the same is: Exemption = Capital Gains * (Cost of new asset / Net Consideration)

This essentially means that if only a part of the sales proceeds is invested in the new house, then exemption is allowed on the capital gain proportionate to the amount invested.

Practical Example

Consider this scenario: Mr. Sharma sold a plot of land (a long-term capital asset) for Rs 50 lakh, which he had initially purchased (indexed cost of acquisition) for Rs 15 lakh. With the sales proceeds, he bought a new residential house for Rs 40 lakh.

Here, the capital gains from the sale of the land is Rs 50 lakh – Rs 15 lakh = Rs 35 lakh. Since he invested less than the total sale proceeds, his exemption will be calculated as per the formula for partial exemption, i.e.,

Exemption = Capital Gains * (Cost of new asset / Net Consideration)

         = Rs 35 lakh * (Rs 40 lakh / Rs 50 lakh)

         = Rs 28 lakh

Hence, Mr. Sharma’s taxable capital gain will be Rs 35 lakh – Rs 28 lakh = Rs 7 lakh.

Violation of Terms and Tax Implications

If the new asset (residential house) is sold within a period of three years from the date of its purchase or construction, the exemption granted under Section 54F will be revoked. The capital gains exempted earlier would be deemed to be long-term capital gains of the year in which the new asset is sold.

Furthermore, if the amount deposited in the Capital Gains Account Scheme is not used for purchasing or constructing a new house within the specified period, the unused amount will be treated as long-term capital gains.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q1. Can I claim exemption under Section 54F if I already own a residential house?

Answer: Yes, you can claim the exemption even if you already own a residential house. However, the exemption under Section 54F is not available if you own more than one residential house apart from the new asset, on the date of the transfer of the original asset. Also, if you buy another residential property within one year or construct a new one within three years of the transfer of the original asset, the exemption under Section 54F would become void.

Q2. Can I claim an exemption if I invest the capital gain in two residential properties?

Answer: As per the rules of Section 54F, the exemption is available only if the investment is made in one residential house located in India. If you invest in more than one house, the exemption will not be available.

Q3. What happens if I do not utilize the entire amount deposited under the Capital Gains Account Scheme (CGAS)?

Answer: If the amount deposited under the CGAS is not used for the purchase or construction of a new residential property within the specified period, the unutilized amount will be treated as long-term capital gain in the year in which the period of three years from the date of transfer of the original asset expires.

Q4. Can I claim exemption under Section 54F when I sell a residential property?

Answer: Section 54F is applicable when you sell a long-term capital asset other than a residential property, like land, gold, etc., and invest the net consideration in a residential property. If you sell a residential property and buy another residential property, the exemption can be claimed under Section 54 of the Income Tax Act, not Section 54F.

Q5. What if I am unable to invest the capital gains before the due date of filing of income tax return?

Answer: If you are not able to invest the capital gains in a new asset before the due date of filing of income tax returns, you can deposit the amount in the Capital Gains Account Scheme (CGAS) with any authorized bank. You should then utilize this amount for buying or constructing a new property within the prescribed timelines.

Q6. Is section 54F benefit applicable if i invest in a commercial property or land?

No, the benefit of Section 54F of the Income Tax Act is not applicable if you invest in a commercial property or land. The exemption under this section is specifically provided for the purchase or construction of a residential property. If you sell a long-term capital asset and invest the proceeds in a commercial property or land, you would not be able to claim an exemption under Section 54F.

Remember, this section is designed to promote investment in residential real estate, hence its benefits are confined to residential properties.

This concludes our article on Section 54F of the Income Tax Act. The goal was to simplify the terms and conditions under this section and enable you to understand how you can benefit from it.

Remember, tax laws can be intricate and complicated. It’s always a good idea to seek advice from a tax professional or a chartered accountant to understand these amendments’ implications on your tax planning and compliance.

Disclaimer

The materials provided herein are solely for educational and informational purposes. No attorney/professional-client relationship is created when you access or use the site or the materials. The information presented on this site does not constitute legal or professional advice and should not be relied upon for such purposes or used as a substitute for professional or legal advice.

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26 Comments

  1. A good article giving insight of section 54F. However, a doubt arises about taxability of unutilized amount in CGAS in section 54F, as to whether full unutilized amount would be taxable or only the proportionate amount of capital gain. For example, one deposits full net sale consideration amount of say Rs 50 Lacs in CGAS in section 54F to get capital gain exemption of say Rs 20 Lacs. Now if he is able to able to invest Rs 25 Lacs only in purchasing a residential flat, leaving unutilized amount of 25 Lacs in CGAS. Now whether Rs. 25 Lacs would be taxable or Rs 10 Lacs only (proportionate capital gain). Would be grateful, if clarified. Thanks.

  2. What will happen if I paid the net consideration to a developer/builder and it takes more than 3 years to complete construction of the property.

  3. I have bought a flat ( say flat A) selling shares and claimed section 54 f benefit.
    I sold another flat ( not flat A) and invested the capital gain in a new flat . I do not own any other flat. Can I claim both these benefits in same financial year.
    Will 54 f be disallowed since I am buying another flat within one year of sale of original asset.

  4. I purchased a new flat from a builder in September 2023.An agreementmade with buyer of my land in October 15th 2023.Consideration will be available within six months.
    I wanted to avail 54f.
    Pl advice.

  5. If the net consideration is 100 and cost of new asset (house) is 150 where remaining 50 is raised through home loan. Now, do we have the scope to further invest 50 by repayment of home loan on next event of capital gain arising:
    1) with-in 365 days of sale of original asset
    2) after 365 days of sale of original asset

    1. repayment of housing loan is not considered acquisition of new house property for claiming deduction u/s 54 or 54F. Also, after claiming deduction u/s 54F, a new house cannot be purchased for two years of constructed for 3 years.

      – educational purpose only

    2. Hi Ashish,
      I brought under construction flat last year with 54f benefit- stamp duty/registration was done on 5 december 2022. Construction will get completed in next 5-6 months. When can I sell this new flat? 3 years after purchase or 3 years after construction completed?

  6. Can I deposit sale proceeds of my house in S/B account direct or am I to deposit the money in CGAS before proceeding to buy new house to avail benefit of exemption under sec 54F ?

    1. CGAS account is to be opened if amount to be utilised for buying new house property, is not used before the due date of filing of income tax return. Otherwise, you can buy directly.

      – education purposes only

  7. Sir we have farming land and convert in
    Plots nearby 100plots, but in village it sell slowly, for capital gain can we purchase house and how much residential property we can purchase
    This in my mother name

  8. I am planing to sell my vacant land and equity shares in listed companies which are held for more than 3 years and purchase a new residential flat by investing the total net consideration in addition to my savings.

    The expected sale price of equity shares and the vacant land will be around 57 lakhs.

    The value of the new property will be around 2 crore.

    The additional amount apart from the net consideration of 57 lakhs will be from my savings.

    I have already owing a residential flat.

    Am I am eligible to claim under Sec 54F, the entire capital gain arising from the original asset, (that is Vacant land and equity shares in listed companies) since I am utilising the entire net consideration of 57 lakhs for the purchase of a new residential property valuing Rs. 2 crore.

  9. I have two buildings each comprising of shops and residential quarters which have been given on rent and never used for my residence.
    Now I sell a plot and buy residential property for my own residence. Will I be allowed deductions under section 54F and 54EC of the IT Act.

  10. I have two houses and one residential plot, I want to dispose one house and one plot to buy one house, csn I avail exemption under 54 and 54F respectively.

  11. If I bought my second house in Sep’23 and now sell my MF investments. Can I claim 54f exemption on CG for the MF so sold. Do I need to open a CGAS account?

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